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Backups

The server named elephant is backed up nightly. Giving everybody the ability to collaboratively edit files means that there's a higher possibility of a mistake deleting or losing someone else's (or even one's own) work or data. It's important that everyone be especially careful to manually copy the file first whenever making an edit that has significant. We have plenty of disk space on elephant, so don't ever be shy about making a copy of something that you're working on/with.

It's also now possible to do your personal backups to elephant using a mapped drive (instead of sftp or scp)

To mount a network drive:

Macs:

Click on the finder, then select Go from the menu at the top, then Connect to Server and type:

smb://elephant/homes

in to the Server Address: box that pops up. (Click the + button to save this server name so you don't have to type it again.)

Click Connect and you will be prompted for your Simon's Rock user name and your SMB password. Enter them and click OK.

Your folder on Elephant will show up as an icon on your desktop and in the list of drives at the top left of every finder window.

Windows

Open "My Computer" and choose the Tools menu, then Map Network Drive... Choose a drive letter for elephant from the drop-down list. It defaults to Z:, and can be any letter that your system is not using. In the Folder: box, enter

\\elephant\homes

Click the link "Connect using a different user name" and enter you Simon's Rock user name and your SMB password in the dialog. Click OK to close the password dialog.

Check the box Reconnect at login if you want the system to automatically restore this connection every time you restart.

Click Finish to map your folder on Elephant to a drive in your system.

Open "My Computer" and click the drive letter you selected when you mapped the drive to access your files on Elephant.

Note

Using the correct case is crucial when typing your username and password, so don't capitalize any of the letters in your username, and you must type the upper and lower case parts of your password exactly as you set it.